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Maximum size for Yellow Perch retention


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#1 Brent

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:07 PM

Ah, the things you find while looking up other stuff.  I never noticed before, that there is a MAXIMUM length for retention of yellow perch.  Granted, its 50cm (20"), and I believe the world record is 18", caught two centuries ago, but still.

I gotta admit, I'd have some regret sliding that much pan-fried goodness back overboard.

brent


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#2 sdavis

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 08:50 PM

Ah, the things you find while looking up other stuff.  I never noticed before, that there is a MAXIMUM length for retention of yellow perch.  Granted, its 50cm (20"), and I believe the world record is 18", caught two centuries ago, but still.

I gotta admit, I'd have some regret sliding that much pan-fried goodness back overboard.

brent

Pretty much any species of fish, including shellfish, I have ever eaten tastes better when smaller... as they get larger / older they do not taste as good and sometimes terrible depending on the species (ever have a 3+ lbs lobster for example compared to a nice sweet canner size?). So, considering the large ones are the best/biggest spawners anyway, all the more reason to throw the large ones back!

 

Sorry, a bit off topic :-)


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#3 duckboy2010

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 09:28 PM

I think when the Maritime Fishing Regulations under the Federal Fisheries Act were last updated the ridiculous minimum and maximum size limits were put in place. It was recognized that the size limits were not relevant (would anyone actually consider keeping a 10 cm musky or pickerel?). I think by having a size limit in place it is easy to change them and implement relevant size limits if required in the future with less bureaucracy (see the issue with designating waters for ice fishing in other topics).  


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#4 Retroboy

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:05 PM

That makes sense.

 

But that being said, the lower size limits DO protect in some cases for other species.

 

Shortnose sturgeon have a 120cm lower size limit and that works well because the vast majority of those fish (probably 90+%) come in at under that size. I've caught over 25 in the past two years and have yet to snag one that could be retained.


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#5 Homebrew76

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 07:13 AM

Sturgeon is a special case, given that we have the only real healty population in North America in our rivers.    The size limitation (there is no max size) was put in place to give anglers a chance of catching one to keep, though such a fish would likely be 50+ years old and nearing the end of it's life cycle.    We should think outselves lucky that we have a healthy populationand can catch/release them where in other parts it would be considered illegal.

 

As far as the subject of the conversation goes, have max size limitation larger than one could feasibly catch does seem quite silly.    I'd love to be the one guy that hits that max yellow perch size and get all the fame and glory and riches that go with it...... errr, perhaps I need to rethink that motivation!


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#6 Stroover

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 10:32 AM

I can't even fathom a twenty inch perch! That would be guargantuous! Can you imagine?


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#7 Brent

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 10:55 AM

Nope, cannot imagine, really.  I fish for them with a 3wt flyrod, and I'm pretty sure I'd be seriously undergunned. :wacko:  On the other hand, it would be a fun 20 minutes or so.

 

Re: the larger fish being the best source of genetic material, I think that's a very good point, in general.  Back when I worked at DNR, one of the fisheries biologists told me that they often found the largest brookies they took as broodstock (and we're talking 5 -6+ lbs) were actually not always a good source of eggs because they had aged past their reproductive prime.  I don't recall whether it was the number of eggs or the fertility of the eggs that was the issue. 

If nothing else, it explains why its so hard to catch those really big brookies: they're moody, menopausal fish who just want to be left alone. <_<

brent


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#8 casey hayward

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 12:32 PM

They are like me !!! hahaha
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#9 ipop

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 02:28 PM

ohhhh this brings back a sad memory.

 

a lot of years ago I was fishing a local lake in east Saint John (or close), trying for browns and land lochs. instead I was landing yellow perch after yellow perch. moving around in the lake made no difference, just more yellow perch.

 

I caught a big one. back then i like most others considered them garbage fish (i had never eaten one -ohps!), so i gutted it and used the eggs for bait. bigger ohps. no camera, yep , another ohps.

this yellow perch was 18", measured against my kayak. way bigger ohps!!!! no lol on this one. i never caught any browns or land lochs that day, and never realized it was a trophy or record fish until after that. some day i'll try for it's decendants, hope for another record, but there are still brown trout and land lochs there....


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#10 Brent

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 04:09 PM

Hah!  That's a great story!  Yes, I think you should go back.  And don't tell anyone where. (well, you can message me :lol:).  Hope you do manage to land her granddaughter some day.

brent


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#11 Micropterus

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 08:47 PM

I have seen one yellow perch over 2lbs landed in the Kennebecasis and have seen 2 more about that size in the river in the last 15 or so years.

 

Out of all the years I've been fishing, I've seen a few brook trout over 4lbs in local streams/rivers (big for southern NB), one smallmouth bass two springs in a row that was well over 6+ lbs and at least 2-3 pickerel that would have contended for the world record. Not to mention 2-3 stripers that fought like nothing I've had on the line before, but I never even saw them. There are monster fish in NB, it just takes years to get your chance at them and only seconds for them to get off....There is a reason those fish got that big and lived that long in the first place..they know how to get unhooked. 


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#12 MackTrev

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 01:16 PM

if you go to Europe, their yellow perch regularly get over 2lbs. But they also don't retain many, and it's mostly a sport fishing niche. But interesting that in northern EU they get so big, while ours remain smaller.. must be something in the water! lol


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#13 Brent

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 03:08 PM

MackTrev:

I'm pretty sure Europe's is a different species.  Ours is Perca flavescens and theirs is Perca fluviatilis.  I believe the record for the latter is over 8 lbs.  Now THAT's a perch!  

That's an interesting point you make about their perch going back in the water.  I recall reading (might have been over a decade ago) that in the UK, the so-called 'rough' fish anglers (tench, barbel, perch, chub, etc) put almost all their fish back, and the 'sport' fish anglers (those who have the privilege of accessing trout and salmon on private waters) tend to keep their catch.  I'm not sure if that is still the case, but the author was pointing out the diametrically opposed philosophies between the UK and the US.  I also don't remember him acknowledging the potential toxicity of warm-water fish in a crowded and developed landscape as being a factor..

brent 


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#14 big bad bud

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 06:39 AM

I snuck out for an hour last summer and fished in Hoyt and caught several perch near the bridge that were +12 inches long. Do people eat them? I thought that they were big!


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#15 Brent

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 07:08 AM

Yes, indeed, people DO eat them.  When I was a youngster in Ontario, virtually all of the fish sold as fish and chips was yellow perch from Lake Erie.  That was before the lake 'died'.(since recovered, partially thanks to zebra mussels).

I eat them out of the same system you were fishing, and a 12" perch will give you a couple of very nice fillets.  Dip 'em in egg, bread crumbs and fry in butter.

Dang.  Now I'm hungry.

brent


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#16 Joe Branscombe

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Posted 17 January 2016 - 10:32 AM

They are fine  eating


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#17 gmac

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 02:55 PM

I've taken 13 inchers out of Loc Lomond Lake and yes,they are one of the best eating fish out there!


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#18 Admeister

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 02:51 PM

I gotta say, bigger isn't always better! This weekend I had a perch fry from some I kept this summer, and my PB was 12.5" from the Oromocto river. Well the 8" perch were so much more tender - the big guy was kinda tough! Flavour wise it was still great (even though it was breaded with Gluten Free crumbs... ick) but yeah, just something to consider when you're deciding whether to keep and eat or let it go to catch another time.


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#19 edwardj

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 07:22 PM

Is there any perch in  northern New Brunswick. I just got back into fishing and want to fish as widely as possible and am not familiar with fishing here.


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#20 flyfishing90

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 09:10 AM

edwardj, Nictau lake in Mount Carleton provincial park is full of them.


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